Seasonal Swims of 2016

 

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Please email us your Seasonal Swims and we’ll add them to our list swimfree4@gmail.com

Wildswim.wordpress.com does not organise any of these swims, we have simply collated a list for general interest … please remember that all swimmers swim at their own risk …

LOUGH HYNE LAPPERS … Every Sunday throughout the winter, 11.30am … meet for swims, all welcome, Lough Hyne, Co Cork

https://www.facebook.com/LoughHyneLappers/

12 SWIMS OF CHRISTMAS … Donaghadee Chunky Dunkers … Check out the Chunky Dunkers Facebook page, these are not organised events and all swimmers swim at their own risk…

https://www.facebook.com/groups/319941478354115/?fref=nf

FREEZING FOR A REASON … Special Olympics Polar Plunge …

3rd December:

Titanic Quarter, Belfast 11am  /  Forty Foot, Dublin 1pm  /  Clougherhead Beach, Co Louth 1pm  /  Rosslare Strand, Co Wexford 1pm

10th December:

Ringaskiddy, Cork 12n  /  Salthill Promenade, Galway 1pm  /  Rathmullan, Donegal 1.30pm

Registration: £15 / €15 plus additional fundraising requested, see link below. 

Special Olympics Ireland Polar Plunge 2016

TURKEY SWIMS 2016 … throughout December, Co Cork …

Sunday 27 Nov, 2.30pm Sandycove

Sat 3rd Dec 12.30 Myrtleville

Sat 10th Dec 12.30 Sandycove

Sat 17th Dec 11.00am Myrtleville

Sun 18th Dec 10.00am Sandycove

https://sandycoveswimmers.com/2016/10/15/turkey-swims-2016/

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SANTA SPLASH … 18th December 1.30pm … Arcadia Beach / East Strand Portrush

Swimming costume & a Santa Hat … £5 minimum donation to Children’s Heartbeat Trust

Arcadia Bathing Club every Sunday 10.30am … All swims at your own risk.

https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=arcadia%20bathing%20club

PIER TO PIER … Christmas Eve 9.30am … Carlingford, Co Louth

https://www.facebook.com/events/1131397306928279/

Registration at 8.45am

Any enquiries or to help out with this event
Contact Jennifer: +353863983403 loudyank@gmail.com

OPERATION FREEZE KNEES … Christmas Day 12noon…. Portstewart Strand and all donations go to the Coleraine Hospice Support Group.

CHRISTMAS DAY SWIM … 11.30am … Newcastle Harbour, Co Down… Donations in aid of Motor Neurone Disease.

BOXING DAY… 10.45 for 11 am plunge… Bangor – Ballyholme Yatch Club… Donations in aid of Action Medical Research – SPARKS NI

www.action.org.uk/boxing-day-swim

DARE TO DIP … New Years Day 11.00am … Crawfordsburn Beach, Co Down

https://cancerfocusni.org/events/dare-to-dip/

NEW YEARS SPLASH … AWARE-ni … Monday 2nd January 12noon for 12.30 splash… Newcastle Beach (near Sleeve Donard Hotel)

www.aware-ni.org/newyearsplash.html

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BALLYGALLEY CO ANTRIM COAST

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A Tale of Two swims…

Words by Maureen McCoy

Photography by Paul McCambridge

With the early evening sun on our shoulders Alison and I entered the calm sea at Ballygalley beach. I was struck by the simple beauty of the muted greens and greys of the sandy floor, moving through the spectrum to soft blue. The deeper water then revealed emerald green, bright with shafts of sunlight dancing across the sand.

The bay was flat calm, the water silky as Alison and I swam out to a large pink buoy then, keeping parallel to the beach, aimed for the rocks at the end of the bay.  The water was cool and perfectly clear, I could see the occasional rock deep beneath, covered with sea-weed in a desert of sand.  We passed two more buoys, their weed encased ropes curving down into the depths conjured thoughts of a ghost ship, covered in years of growth.

Turning back down the beach in an amicable front-crawl, together we swept past the Castle Hotel with its imposing façade.

The lighthouse beam from the Maidens swept across the beach as we left the sea,

dressed in our scruffy after-swim joggers and with salty hair and sandy flip-flops went into the Ballygalley Castle Hotel and ordered hot chocolate and coffee, and watched the sun go down over the glassy water.

Alison Cardwell and Maureen McCoy

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A year later and the same spot provided a very different swim. Michelle was waiting for favourable tides for her North Channel solo and was keen to keep her cold tolerance high. So on a windy Saturday with a group of friends, lulled by the recent hot weather, we bravely set off. The water was cold and choppy as we waded out and our sanity was questioned. Rachel and Erin led the way by quickly plunging in, followed by Michelle then myself and finally the boys, “It’s actually not that bad once you get going!” said a surprised Richard. Although it took a little time to adjust their breathing amidst the waves and chop and quite a lot of water made it into their mouths, they enjoyed the exhilaration of the surf.

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Michelle and I headed across the bay, feeling the power of the sea as the waves pushed us towards the shore and we had to adjust our course. We soared above forests of kelp, shafts of sunlight piercing the water and the occasional crab scuttling along the sea-bed on some errand, oblivious to the maelstrom above. We had to stop regularly to regain sight of each other in the choppy water – neither of us wanted to go back saying we’d lost the other!

Finally we returned, dressed and joined the others to sprinkle sand again on the hotels carpets!

Ballygalley

 

Parking in-front of the hotel with steps leading to the beach.

A long strand, popular with families and very clear water.

An ideal training ground for long distance or triathletes with approximately a 1km stretch across the bay.

KINBANE CASTLE NORTH ANTRIM COAST

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Words by Maureen McCoy

Photography by Paul McCambridge

Pulling into the small car park on the cliff at Kinbane I looked across to the clearest view of Rathlin Island I have ever seen.  The island is approximately seven miles from Ballycastle but looks so close today.  Behind the island the hazy shore of the Mull of Kintyre with calm deep blue water in between.  One thinks it would be easy to swim, but this is some of the coldest water around our shores and it would take many hours.

Following the steps which snake down the cliff led to a small cove with the remains of the old castles watch tower on a rugged outcrop.  Along the shore a roofless cottage with the rusting remains of a winch and then we could see the cave under the castle ruins that was to be todays swim.

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Clambering over rocks and forests of kelp we used a variation of dog-paddle and crawling, pulling ourselves through the weed until it was deep enough to swim. We made our way deep into the cave and seeing a glimpse of sky, ventured on through the arch carved by sea, under the ruins to emerge on the sea-ward side of the island.  Here the draw of the waves was powerful and sea birds above whistled and called. As we returned we were pushed forward on each wave then suspended, waiting for the next rush, as if on a swing we were drawn back and forth by the sea.

Cave at Kinbane

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An advanced swim due to the strength of tides here, a good knowledge of the tides and currents essential.

Beautiful spot to picnic and explore

Car park with toilets.

Long climb down steps to get to the cove.

THE “SLOUGH” – DUNSEVERICK – NORTH ANTRIM COAST

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Words by Maureen McCoy

Photography By Paul McCambridge

Early evening and nearing the end of a super day exploring the North Coast, the weather was glorious, the warmest day we’d had in weeks.  The evening sun lit up the grassy field as we parked the car on the roadside behind many other cars and climbed over the stile to follow the path down to the Slough.

On the far side of the inlet, nestled on the small patches of sand between large rocks were a couple of extended family groups, with children ranging in ages from a very vocal two year old to teenage.  With wind-breaks pegged into the sand and folding chairs set up, they had been there for the whole day.  Another family picked their way across the rocks, barefoot and in wetsuits to jump from the lower ledges, gaining confidence to later try the high rocks on the opposite side.

As we got closer and the whole of the Slough came into view, a bright pink li-lo starkly contrasted with the teal-green deep water.  Drifting on this was young man, long hair tied back calling instructions to his friends on the rocks.  Another then threw down a large rubber ring and took a great leap from on high to land in the centre.  We all laughed and clapped at his display.

Kealan and I headed to these high rocks.  Kealan jumped first and as I stepped forward I felt a twinge of nerves.  My cautious nature made me hesitate and assess the depth, judge the distance I would need to jump out to clear the rock walls and my heart beat faster as I realised there was no turning back.  3-2-1- jump!  I think I might have squealed a little!  My feet hit the water and I pulled my arms in close to my body, as soon as I was underwater I opened my arms and used a breast stroke kick to stop myself from hitting the bottom.  I needn’t have bothered, wearing my wetsuit I was so buoyant that I popped up again like a cork and bobbed about in the gentle ebb and flow of the inlet.  Barefoot I climbed back up the rocks for a second go.  Then it was time to lose the wetsuit.  The black rocks were warm with the sun beating on them all day and after a few more jumps, and Kealan somersaulting a couple of times, I felt a dive was in order.  Nothing spectacular, just a clean straight dive, start low and work up to one of the higher rocks.

I tested myself on a low rock, ever cautious of the depth, and executed a passable straight dive, next step, a little higher.  The higher I went the more respect I felt for cliff divers, I would never be brave enough for that.  A couple more dives and then I thought I should quit while I was ahead and embarrassment free, maybe with some diving practice I’ll return brave enough to resurrect my somersault, I don’t promise anything though.

I warmed myself on the black rocks as the groups of people began to disperse and we agreed that a long days swimming and exploring now warranted a good feed, the evening sun still strong as we dressed.

Slough at Dunseverick

A lovely inlet with varying levels to plunge from which should satisfy most age ranges.

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CARRICK-A-REDE Rope Bridge

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Words By Maureen McCoy

Photography By Paul McCambridge

The sun was high as we arrived mid-day at Larrybane Bay, Paul, his son Kealan and I.   As we walked down the path and got our first view of the bay my breath was almost taken away.  The white cliffs, reminiscent of Dover, then the rocky shoreline similar to a Croatian coast and the tall grass-topped and sheer cliff islands rising out of the sea, like something straight out of a movie shot in Thailand.  Who would believe we had such a place in Ireland.

The bay curves around providing a great coastal scramble with caves breaking up the tall white cliffs and in places the most perfect white rounded pebbles you could ever hope to find.  Wading out into the shallow bay though, the rocks give way to a clear sandy floor.

We struck out on the one kilometre swim straight across to Carrick-a-rede Island. Looking down through the emerald green water to the sand deep below unbroken by any sea-weed or rocks, I felt I could be in any exotic location in the world.  The tide, still on its way out left shallow water under the bridge, so shallow that we could walk through.  Occasionally dipping into deeper patches as we waded under, it felt like walking through a fair-ground fun house, up, then down, then up again.  As the water got deeper again we swam on between the towering cliffs of the island and the shore, people high above us carefully picking their way across the rope bridge.

As I rounded the corner it seemed I was swimming into the “Lost World” with great Jurassic black cliffs soaring above.  Exploring these rocks and the clear water below was a joy and we spent a long time breast-stroking and gazing up, almost expectant of a prehistoric creature to swoop down at any moment.

The tiny Fisherman’s cottage on the island had a fresh coat of white-wash and the steep steps leading down to the waters edge with the old winch broken and rusting, showed the remnants of the old Salmon Fishery here in times past.  The sun was still strong as we made our way back under the bridge and out across Larry Bane Bay for that second kilometre swim back through those emerald waters.

A good two kilometre round trip for the strong and confident swimmer. 

Follow the signs to Carrick-a-rede Rope Bridge, a National Trust site, which is worth a visit to cross the Bridge and get an impressive view of the coastal cliffs from the island.

From the car park, follow the road down to the overspill car park in the Quarry.  Here you can park and follow the track on foot to the shore.

This is an advanced swim for the experienced open water swimmer.  Although not difficult it requires knowledge of the swimmers limitations and of the local tides.

It is wise to avoid the bay on the Sheep Island side of Larry Bane as here the currents are much stronger and the eddies and tides can be powerful.

PORTMUCK Island Magee Co Antrim

©Paul McCambridge - Portmuck 14b

 

Words by Maureen McCoy

Photography by Paul McCambridge

When an acquaintance told me of her “mad Aunt” who swims in the sea every day I simply had to meet this like-minded soul.  A phone-call later and I met Maureen the following week.

Mo lives in Jordanstown and swims daily throughout the year, her summer months she spends on Island Magee in a beautiful cottage looking down onto Portmuck harbour.  The view is stunning with the small, old-fashioned harbour built into a natural cove, cliffs protecting it on each side.  Seeing this rugged shoreline with the harbour wall curving out into the sheltered cove, my heart rose.

Mo was waiting for us in the car park, a retired teacher, she oozed life and vitality.

It seems many of the people who own holiday cottages here have spent their summers since childhood at Island Magee so there is a great family atmosphere.  Mo’s son and a friend had, on the previous weekend, raised over ten thousand pounds for Cancer Research, jumping from the harbour wall every hour on the hour, in fancy dress.

We stripped to our swimsuits and walked down the slipway into the cold water.  Swimming a gentle breast-stroke out past the wall where two fishermen wished us good morning – I felt transported back in time to the 30’s, a more simple life were the daily constitutional would have been a pleasant swim like this.

We swam across the bay towards the White Cliffs, an un-concerned Oystercatcher and some Cormorants bobbed along, ignoring us.

The water felt silky as it glided over my skin, the shock of cold had worn off.  I felt connected to the landscape, submerged in it, listening to the sensations of my body, the air and the water touching my skin, the slight movement of the sea hinting the strength in the tide that the calm surface belied.

The sun glinted on the surface as we retraced our course back into the harbour, the shallower water was a little warmer.  We dressed and went back to Mo’s cottage where we sipped tea and nibbled buttered Barmbrack in front of a log fire.

I finally had to leave this idyll and made my way toward home with the promise to return, very soon.

Portmuck Harbour is well sheltered and provides a beautiful swimming area but be aware of strong tides outside the harbour and around Pig Island where it is not recommended to swim.