The Legend of Jenny Watt

The Legend of Jenny Watt by Brian Meharg, Bangor Boats

Beautifully illustrated by Janet King

Book Cover 1

Bangor’s first children’s book by North Channel Pilot and amateur historian Brian Meharg has captured the imaginations of children and got them wanting to get outdoors and explore their local area.

Reviews:

Esther aged 8years

Esther Smith 1

“The whole idea of the Jenny Watt… it makes you want to find out more and maybe go to the place where the war was. Maybe if you went digging there you might find something magical. This book has a very good sense of adventure and it was very easy to read. I loved where in the very same spot where Jenny Watt was found there was a puppy. That book was just amazing. I love reading new books and I think this was one of the best books I’ve ever read… I thought it was just gorgeous.”

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Elijah aged 11years

Elijah Smith 1

“I thought this book explained the story very well. It made me think what it was like back then when there were smugglers. Whenever they got on their little boat and started smuggling the story got really intense. I loved it so much I read it all in one sitting. The Jenny Watts cave was so cool it made me want to go there and shout “Jenny where is Con” and she would hopefully reply.“gone”. I would recommend this book to children of all ages.

Ps. When I asked for a great book to read I defiantly got one.”

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Lovely reviews from 2 of my swimmers.

Author Brian Meharg signing my copy at Helens Bay…

Brian Meharg and Mo 1

Printed by Impact Printing, Coleraine & Ballycastle – 2018

ISBN 978-1-906689-84-1

Buying on eBay

ILDSA, Global Swim Series Awards – 2018 Season & Ireland Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame

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Female and Male Swimmers of the Year Lisa Cummins and Ion Lazarenco Tiron

Maureen McCoy, photography by Paul McCambridge

Saturday 9th February, 2019 at Belfast Castle

Outdoor Swimmers all over Ireland enjoy a good old get together and this year kicked off at Belfast Castle at lunch time, Saturday.

So much is shared on social media about our endeavours that we now feel we know the people we’ve never actually met so this annual event gives folk a chance to get a little spruced up and meet acquaintances they’ve been following, face to face, ask how it really felt, get inspiration and share their stories.

Between the presentations of awards each of the 4 speakers had a different story to tell. Speaking of their personal journeys, each tale had something that rang true for the crowd in the room.

Speakers:

Vanessa Dawes

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Vanessa Dawes explained how her swimming and art projects meld together. For her they are a combined entity; the research, gathering her group of helpers, and co-swimmers, reconnoitering the swims and finally the completion of her project.

Vanessa Dawes – length of Lough Mask, 2018

Marie Watson

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Marie Watson told us how she came from non-swimming to a world first, the swim to Fastnet Rock; 18km. Her journey started with learning the basics, swimming first in wet-suit then ditching that in favour of “skins” for the Fastnet swim.

Carol Cashel

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Carol Cashel made the transition from pool to open water with some trials on the way. Even coming from a competitive swimming background she said; “it was not easy…” In the beginning she hated it, no lanes to guide her, no blue line on the floor and other swimmers in “her space”. It took several swims to iron out the difficulties and, like each of us, she has learned valuable lessons from her failed swims. No swim is ever wasted and research and preparation are key;

“that’s what we do, as swimmers we are very stubborn – if we get an idea we will, to the best of our ability, just get on with it and get it done…”

Carol Cashel – circumnavigation of Bere Island, 2018

Lisa Cummins

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Lisa Cummins focused on her lessons learned from achievements over the years, from a 2-way English Channel solo in 2009 to a 2-lap Manhattan Island, 2018:

Lesson 1                Don’t train through injury – for the sake of a short rest period at the time of injury one could save oneself years of recurring problems

Lesson 2                Don’t be afraid to dream big – Planning a 2-way English Channel as her first channel attempt; “I felt with the work I’d put in that I’d swim across, then turn around and see what happens. At least I’d always have a 1-way… I didn’t realise at the time it was such a naïve way to think…”

Lesson 3                Not everything goes to plan

Lesson 4                Don’t try something new on the day

What’s next? “For now, I’m chilling out and doing shorter swims.”

Awards;

2019 ILDSA Award Winners List

Juvenile Best Newcomer                                                   Jack Bingham

(Sponsored by Bingo Bus)

Juvenile Best Newcomer Runner Up                          Sabian Kulczynski

(Sponsored by Bangor Boat)

Senior Best Newcomer                                                  Audrey Burkley

(Sponsored by Ei Travel Group)

Ted Keenan Ulster Swimmer of the Year                 Gary Knox

(Sponsored by Infinity Channel Swimming)

Páraic Casey Munster Swimmer of the Year          Lisa Cummins

(Sponsored by Wild Water Adventures)

Connaught Swimmer of the Year                                Fergal Madden

(Sponsored by Aqualine) 

Leinster Swimmer of the Year                                     Vanessa Daws

(Sponsored by Leinster Open Sea)

Best Organised Open Water Swim                                Liffey Swim

(Sponsored by Dublin City Council Events Section)

 Sheena Paterson Spirit of Open Water Swimming               Donaghadee Chunky Dunkers

(Sponsored by Swim Ireland)

Shane Moraghan Award Best Overseas Performance by an Irish Open Water/Marathon Swimmer

(Sponsored by Half Moon Swimming Club)                     Lisa Cummins

Margaret Smith Award                                                        Infinity Group

(Sponsored by Global Swim Series)

Open Water Swim Performance of the Year               Lisa Cummins

(Sponsored by Swim Ulster)

Junior Swimmer of the Year                                             Sabian Kulczynski

(Sponsored by New Wave Swim Buoy)

Female Senior Swimmer of the Year                             Lisa Cummins

(Sponsored by Pier 36)

Male Swimmer of the Year                                               Ion Lazarenco Tiron

(Sponsored by Pier 36)

 

Lisa Cummins: 

Páraic Casey Munster Swimmer of the Year – Shane Moraghan Award Best for Overseas Performance by an Irish Open Water/Marathon Swimmer – Female Swimmer of the Year 2018.

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Ion Lazarenzo Tiron:

 

Irish Open Water Swimmer of the year – Ireland Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame,

Seven Oceans Swimmer.

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He has also been nominated for Nobel Peace Prize for his #SwimOfPeace, Moldova.

“Believe in your dreams….my objective; the message of peace…I thought; if I do all these swims they will listen, and they did…”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7PxMEC9hVk

8th person to complete the Oceans Seven and the first to complete each crossing on his 1st attempt.

The Irish Long Distance Swimming Association event couldn’t have happened without the help of so many people and sponsors. Thanks to Stephen Millar, Caroline Grierson, Anne-Louise Docherty, Heather Grierson, Joao Santos and Gary Knox to name but a few.

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After an evening meal and socializing a Stormont Hotel, Belfast, Sunday saw just a few souls brave the water at Helen’s Bay for a quick dip – a frosty but beautifully sunny morning.

Safe journey home to all!

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Thank you, Brian Meharg (Bangor Boats) author of Bangors’ first Children’s book; The Legend of Jenny Watt – for an impromptu book signing at the water’s edge.

http://bangorboat.com/jenny-watt-bangor-childrens-book/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iz5BAbyaLLQ

“11 Feet” Never gave an inch to conquer North Channel

11feet - N. Channel relay team 1 Web use 1

L-R Adrian, John, Jacqueline, Alison, Barry and David

’11 Feet’ – Never Gave An Inch!

Words by Maureen McCoy

Picture by Paul McCambridge – MAC Visual Media

When David Burke was asked to sign a piece of paper without reading it, he knew he had let himself in for a big challenge.

Having had his left leg amputated above the knee, at the age of only seven, after being hit by a car while watching a stock-car race in Dundalk. David was then determined to learn to swim, he told me how, when he went to lessons with his school, the other children would play and splash about but “I worked and worked at my swimming.” He went on to compete at the Paralympic games in the 400 metres Freestyle; “I never liked sprinting!”

David recently returned to swimming through triathlon events, “I saw people posting their achievements online and I thought; I could do that.” So his open water journey began 3 years ago, training with the Newry Triathlon club, Co Armagh, and then venturing into Camlough Lake.

Last years “Around the Rock” 1.5 km swim at Warrenpoint almost stopped his ambitions. “It was brutal. I was upside-down and thrown everywhere. I came out of that swim petrified. I wasn’t going to swim again.” But he was signed up to swim the following week in a triathlon.

The day before the triathlon, his friend and mentor, Padraig Mallon, completed his own English Channel solo. “After Padraig achieved that I can’t pull out of a 1 mile swim!” so, David faced his fear. “I had a fantastic swim! The quickest amputee there!” he joked. “Towards the finish line I realized I was alone. I thought; either I’m the very last and everyone’s gone or I’m out in front.” It wasn’t until he crossed the line and looked back that he found he was indeed ahead, finishing in 4th place.

Why the North Channel? “I was press-ganged. After last years’ Camlough 5km swim, Padraig took me for a meal, he passed me a piece of paper and said – Sign this, don’t look at it, just sign it, you can read it after. Another friend at the table said; I’m a Doctor, I’ll witness it.” So David signed and was then allowed to read the challenge, a North Channel relay attempt, signed and sealed, two years to deliver.

Training began and winter swimming was on the table, the whole team worked together, supporting each-other through the highs and lows of winter sea swims and building stamina in the pool. The Feel Alive Club was born and stalwarts Alison Cardwell, Jacqueline Galway, Adrian Poucher, John McElroy, Barry Patterson and David were joined by many others in their regular dips in Carlingford Lough. Alison, the most experienced swimmer on the team, has competed for several years in ILDSA events and won Ulster Open Water swimmer of the Year 2013, after completing, amongst other swims, the 25km Lough Erne Challenge. Although the entire team have taken part in various open water events and triathlons for a number of years, the North Channel, a 21 plus mile swim in waters rarely above 12’C is no light under-taking.

Social media messages fired back and forth and as the year progressed the training became more intense. David told me in March how he was feeling more ready, “Compared to how I felt four weeks ago, I now feel more mentally prepared, I know there’s a long way to go yet but every time I get in I learn something more.”

By the 5th of July the lessons learned have paid off, the six strong team of Alison Cardwell, Jacqueline Galway, John McElroy, Adrian Poucher, Barry Patterson and David Burke – “11 Feet” achieved their goal by swimming the North Channel in 12 hours 52 minutes. Each taking a 1-hour stint in the water with David having the honour of both starting the swim and taking the final strokes to the Scottish shore. “I was absolutely shattered, the tide was pushing us from right to left and the wash was bouncing back off the shore. I hit more jelly-fish in the last 20 minutes than in the rest of the swim!”

“We as a team set out to conquer a wee piece of water yesterday, six swimmers and a great support crew. I had the honour of finishing it but would not have unless everyone on board stood up and were counted. Whatever praise comes in about me being the first amp to do it is all your praise as we trained as team suffered as a team and succeeded as a team. To each and everyone one of you we really have done something that will forever bind us. To Padraig thanks for taking me to such a lovely place. To Martina my rock when I was tired and cold, thank you. My dad always blamed himself for my accident and went to his grave thinking that, but yesterday he swam beside me (pity he didn’t remove the jellies). So Dad this ones for you”